Five Reasons Out-of-home Advertising is Gaining Momentum

Out-of-home advertising is projected to grow in 2014 and in the years beyond, thanks to advances in flat screen technology and digital displays. New devices are spurring the creation of eye-catching ads in public areas, causing marketers to adjust their ad campaigns and marketing strategies. In particular, there are five reasons why out-of-home advertising is gaining momentum.

High-quality Video Screens

Video screens that are durable, thin and display high-quality images are changing the way consumers view information. Digital devices can replace banners, posters and other print media that once dominated out-of-home advertising. Many of these digital devices have audio features, adding another dimension to ad campaigns that can capture consumers’ attention. Also, high-quality video screens can be used to feature multiple ads, making them more versatile than print ads.

Interactive Advertising Features

Print ads rarely have any type of interactive features, but digital devices can have touchscreen options to gain consumers’ attention and generate leads. For instance, a drawing to win a prize can be added to a digital device, allowing consumers to use touchscreen features to enter their information. Other interactive features such as games, which can be projected to wide audiences, also help in grabbing consumers’ attention.

Lower Advertising Costs

Since digital devices can display any number of ads, they cut down on the cost of advertising. Print ads are typically good for one campaign only. Posters and billboard signs have to be taken down and re-printed if there are changes to ads or prices. Digital devices don’t have to be taken down, remounted or re-designed. Instead, their programing has to be changed slightly in order to display new images, ads or promotions. This can save advertisers a lot of money over the long run.

Higher Market Penetration

Given the population density of most major U.S. cities and other major metropolitan areas around the world, out-of-home advertising has the power to reach large numbers of people. This helps advertisers penetrate their target markets, by displaying ads in the high-traffic areas that their customers frequent. For instance, ads for luggage or travel-related products displayed in busy airports have the power to capture the attention of passersby interested in new luggage or travel gear.

Captive Audiences

Even though digital devices are revolutionizing out-of-home advertising, traditional print ads and banners are still proving effective in areas with captive audiences. For instance, fans at ballparks are likely to see banners on outfield walls and in stadium hallways. Captive audiences are a prime target for out-of-home adverting, because marketers have a wide audience to promote their products, services and brand image to.

As the out-of-home advertising industry continues to evolve, consumers will see new types of ads in waiting rooms, train stations, airports and other public areas.  Given the foot traffic in public areas, ads in these places have the potential to capture customers’ attention and generate leads for future sales.

Resources:

(1)    The Economist: Out-of-home advertising — Billboard boom
(2)    Forbes: Out Of Home Ads Still Growing
(3)    The Wall Street Journal: Clear Channel Outdoor Showcases Power of Integrated Out-Of-Home and Mobile Advertising at Cannes Lions 2014
(4)    The Irish Times: Boom in out-of-home advertising as banks increase their spend by 200%

Being Technology Forward (aka a Glasshole)

San Francisco #throughglass

I’m a little surprised that people seem to have widely varying opinions about Google Glass. While I’m wearing it, people blurt out “Glass!”, “Google Glasses!”, “Cyclops!”, “What is that?”, “Terminator!” and “Glasshole!”. People stop me everywhere — grocery stores, bars, the street, my doctor’s office. Wearing them is an invitation to be asked about them and I don’t mind. I’d like people to understand them better. In fact, I like when people try it on, with a couple of commands, they get the Glass experience and their eyes light up like children. Even my teenager, who, despite being so dependent on her iPhone, rejects technology…even she couldn’t hold back saying “That’s actually pretty sick, mom” and lets me wear it in public.

The press is all over Sarah Slocum’s use of Glass and her run in with some people who didn’t want to be taped in San Francisco’s Lower Haight district. I’ve been to that area, there are friendlier neighborhoods. However, just like the poster child for wearing Glass while driving, Sarah has been experiencing some early-stage device use hatred. We can get philosophical as to why: they have exclusive distribution and an unwieldy price, a clear and noble use for them hasn’t been communicated, Google has been characteristically quiet about its controversial product.

Nearly everybody has a photo and video capable phone, and nearly all of them are connected to Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and other networks. Unlike Glass, there is no visible indication that they are being used for photos or videos. But in this town, we don’t care what you do. The things I’ve seen. Buy me a drink sometime and I’ll tell you stories. I will capture the world with Glass, with as much permission as I’ve asked for in the past with a camera, audio recorder or similar and that’s where I stand. At a time when we distrust the government because they’ve been tapping into our lives without our permission, Glass is facing some unwarranted displaced fear. It’s a smartphone you wear like glasses, not a futuristic tracking device.

It's not science fiction

And although Robert Scoble recently said he is “skeptical” about Google pushing forward with the device, I think Glass has a functional future, and I love it, however I could see another device outsmarting, out-designing, and out-penetrating Glass.

So, what’s using Google Glass like and what does it do? I’ve had Glass for 6 months, so I’ll tell you what I do with it. Some of what I do on my phone I can also do with Glass. I send and receive text messages (like sending a grocery list to my husband he can pull up on Glass, himself, and not have to take his phone out of his pocket at the grocery store), take and share photos and videos (there are multi-shots, short/long videos, and a community of Glass photographers taking interesting pictures), look up the weather (by voice) and anything else you want on the Internet. Sure, like with any new technical device, I can take photos or videos without people knowing, but let’s be real, wearing Glass is NOT discreet. And I’m no jerk, if you’re interesting enough to tape up close, trust me I’ll ask permission.

Will you get Google Glass when the price comes down and it’s made available to everyone?

Selected Lisacast Shows

I’m rebroadcasting a few shows, in case you missed some of the better ones:

Lisacast with Guest Vipul Vyas of Skewz.com
Lisacast with Guest Jeff Robbins of Lullabot
Lisacast with Guest Juan Carlos Soto
Lisacast with Guest Marla the FlyLady
Lisacast with Guest Marcien Jenckes, Voxant
Lisacast with Guest Michael Leach
Lisacast with Guest Jon Hammond
Lisacast with Guest Alan Levy, BlogTalkRadio
Lisacast with Guest Steve Gal of ProQuo.com
Lisacast with Guest Daphne Kwon
Lisacast with Guest Liad Agmon of Delver
Lisacast with Guest Gina Bianchini, CEO of Ning.com
Lisacast with Guest John Battelle
Lisacast with Guest Don Pierce of Micoy
Lisacast with Guest Elad Yoran of KoolSpan
Lisacast with Guest Jeff Crigler, Voxant CEO
Lisacast with Guests from NY to South Korea
Lisacast with Guest K. Daniel Glover of Aircongress.com
Lisacast with Guest Noam Lemelshtrich-Latar
Lisacast with Guest Thomas Frostberg, Editor-in-Chief and Co-Founder of Rapidus
Lisacast with Guest Sean Wise of WiseMentorCaptial
Lisacast with Guest Rafe Needleman of Webware
Lisacast with Guest Rafael Martinez Alequin
Lisacast with Guest Lee Dryburgh, eComm
Lisacast with Guest Thomas J. Buckholtz, PhD
Lisacast with Guests Claire Ulrich (Le Monde) and Thierry Bezier
Lisacast Interview: Dr. Wong
Lisacast Interview: Dr. Wang, Georgia Tech
Lisacast Interview: David Fox
Lisacast Interview: Dr. Julian Vincent, University of Bath

Lisacast interviews

Do you have a suggestion for a guest on Lisacast? Email me.

SQL Saturday Silicon Valley Event

Here’s a great upcoming event. Lisacast is going. Hope to see you there!

SQL Saturday Silicon Valley

SQL Saturday Silicon Valley with Ross Mistry (Microsoft) and Mark Ginnebaugh (DesignMind)

February 23rd, 8:30 am to 6:00 pm
Microsoft Technology Center, 1065 La Avenida, Building 1, Mountain View, CA, 94043
The largest Bay Area SQL Server event is here again! SQL Saturday sessions include SQL Server 2012, DBA, Development, Business Intelligence, and Big Data. A great post-event networking reception includes raffle prizes! Even better, the event only charges a $10 lunch fee.

Speakers:

  • Angel Abundez, DesignMind
  • Kevin Boles
  • Carlos Bossy, Quanta Intelligence
  • Mitchell Bottel, Innovative IT Consulting
  • William Brown, Microsoft
  • Dan Bulos, Symmetry Corporation
  • Denny Cherry
  • Rob Farley, LobsterPot Solutions
  • Argenis Fernandez, Microsoft
  • Grant Fritchey, Red Gate
  • Mark Ginnebaugh, DesignMind
  • Janis Griffin, Confio
  • Mark Gschwind, DesignMind
  • Allan Hirt, SQLHA
  • Jason Horner
  • Phil Hummel, EMC
  • Rob Kerr, Blue Granite
  • Scott Klein, Microsoft
  • Kevin Kline, SQLSentry
  • Randy Knight, SQL Solutions Group
  • Julie Koesmarno, LobsterPot Solutions
  • Ami Levin, SolidQ
  • Denise McInerney, Intuit
  • Joy Mundy, Kimball Group
  • Dilip Nayak, CUDirect Corporation
  • Aaron Nelson
  • Joe Sack, SQLskills
  • Chris Shaw, Xtivia
  • Pat Sinthusan, NetApp
  • Mickey Steuwe
  • Mark Tabladillo, Mark Tab Consulting
  • Joseph Vertido, Melissa Data
  • Eddie Wuerch, ExactTarget
  • Wenming Ye, Microsoft

Also, join one of two $149 all-day, pre-conference trainings February 22nd Database Configuration and Tuning with Kevin Kline or Introduction to SQL Server Data Mining with Mark Tabladollo

Real World Database Configuration and Tuning
Speaker: Kevin Kline, SQL Server MVP and Director of Engineering at SQL Sentry

Kevin Klien

This multi-module full day seminar covers best practices for database and application design and configuration, implementation, maintenance and performance tuning.

This session has a special focus on IT organizations with large SQL Server deployments.

- Bare metal tuning of server and disk configuration
– Benchmarking performance
– Physical machine versus virtual machine deployment
– Database conceptual design and normalization through to physical deployment of databases, indexing and partitioning
– Understanding SQL Server query performance
– Identifying performance bottlenecks and resolving performance issues
– Automating as much as possible so that life gets easier!

Prerequisites: Basic understanding of SQL Server architecture and administration.

Kevin Kline has been a Microsoft SQL Server MVP since 2004 and is a noted leader in the SQL Server industry. His product designs have won multiple “Best of TechEd” and “Readers’ Choice” awards. He is a founding board member and former president of PASS – The Professional Association for SQL Server. He has written or co-written eleven books including the best-selling SQL in a Nutshell. Kevin contributes monthly columns to SQL Server Pro and DBTA magazines. Kevin is also a top-rated speaker at conferences worldwide such as Microsoft TechEd, the PASS Summit, DevTeach, Oracle OpenWorld, and SQL Connections. He tweets via @kekline and blogs at KevinEKline.com.

Introduction to SQL Server Data Mining
Speaker: Mark Tabladillo, Ph.D and SQL Server MVP

Mark Tabladillo

QL Server 2012 provides enterprise-level data mining technology, ranging from supporting individual analysts through scalable server solutions.  You will see some of the elements of SQL Server Data Mining from the Excel add-in to full-scale production examples implemented by Microsoft Business Intelligence technology.

Mark will explain data mining in a scientifically accurate way while making the technology practically accessible and even fun. This course is appropriate for people new to data mining technology.  However, feel free to bring your more advanced challenges and questions too.

Objectives:

- Provide a fundamental scientific framework for data mining
– Demonstrate the technology with the fundamental Microsoft data mining interfaces
– Offer practical advice in moving from desktop analysis to enterprise-level deployment

Technology:

- SQL Server 2012 Analysis Services (Multidimensional)
– Office 2013 x64 (Excel and Visio) with Data Mining Add-In
– SQL Server 2012 Integration Services
– SQL Server Management Studio
– SQL Server Data Tools

Mark Tabladillo is a SAS expert, Ph.D, and Microsoft MVP.   He helps teams become more confident in making actionable business decisions with the use of data mining and analytics.  Mark provides training and consulting for companies in United States and around the world. He also teaches part-time with the University of Phoenix, and supervised a dissertation with a graduate student living in Canada.

Contact URL: http://marktab.net/datamining