Five Reasons Out-of-home Advertising is Gaining Momentum

Out-of-home advertising is projected to grow in 2014 and in the years beyond, thanks to advances in flat screen technology and digital displays. New devices are spurring the creation of eye-catching ads in public areas, causing marketers to adjust their ad campaigns and marketing strategies. In particular, there are five reasons why out-of-home advertising is gaining momentum.

High-quality Video Screens

Video screens that are durable, thin and display high-quality images are changing the way consumers view information. Digital devices can replace banners, posters and other print media that once dominated out-of-home advertising. Many of these digital devices have audio features, adding another dimension to ad campaigns that can capture consumers’ attention. Also, high-quality video screens can be used to feature multiple ads, making them more versatile than print ads.

Interactive Advertising Features

Print ads rarely have any type of interactive features, but digital devices can have touchscreen options to gain consumers’ attention and generate leads. For instance, a drawing to win a prize can be added to a digital device, allowing consumers to use touchscreen features to enter their information. Other interactive features such as games, which can be projected to wide audiences, also help in grabbing consumers’ attention.

Lower Advertising Costs

Since digital devices can display any number of ads, they cut down on the cost of advertising. Print ads are typically good for one campaign only. Posters and billboard signs have to be taken down and re-printed if there are changes to ads or prices. Digital devices don’t have to be taken down, remounted or re-designed. Instead, their programing has to be changed slightly in order to display new images, ads or promotions. This can save advertisers a lot of money over the long run.

Higher Market Penetration

Given the population density of most major U.S. cities and other major metropolitan areas around the world, out-of-home advertising has the power to reach large numbers of people. This helps advertisers penetrate their target markets, by displaying ads in the high-traffic areas that their customers frequent. For instance, ads for luggage or travel-related products displayed in busy airports have the power to capture the attention of passersby interested in new luggage or travel gear.

Captive Audiences

Even though digital devices are revolutionizing out-of-home advertising, traditional print ads and banners are still proving effective in areas with captive audiences. For instance, fans at ballparks are likely to see banners on outfield walls and in stadium hallways. Captive audiences are a prime target for out-of-home adverting, because marketers have a wide audience to promote their products, services and brand image to.

As the out-of-home advertising industry continues to evolve, consumers will see new types of ads in waiting rooms, train stations, airports and other public areas.  Given the foot traffic in public areas, ads in these places have the potential to capture customers’ attention and generate leads for future sales.

Resources:

(1)    The Economist: Out-of-home advertising — Billboard boom
(2)    Forbes: Out Of Home Ads Still Growing
(3)    The Wall Street Journal: Clear Channel Outdoor Showcases Power of Integrated Out-Of-Home and Mobile Advertising at Cannes Lions 2014
(4)    The Irish Times: Boom in out-of-home advertising as banks increase their spend by 200%

Online Advertising Privacy Regulation: In It To Spin It!

AdAge is talking about the release of the free privacy online icon to smaller companies, not just the license of them to large companies. The icon allows users to opt-out of behavioral targeting. Here’s what the icon looks like:

Free Privacy Online Icon

Open or Closed

It’s not black and white but if it were, there would be ‘open’ people, and there would be ‘closed’ people with regard to behavior online.

Open: Yes, pay attention to my behavior so I don’t receive irrelevant ads. Oooh, horseback riding just a couple of miles away!
Closed: I do not want you to track anything I do online. And, stop sending me stupid ads! (?)

Open: Remember me. I’m terrible at remembering passwords and I sign up for a lot of stuff because I love the Internet.
Closed: Do not save or cookie any information of mine. Hey why do I have to fill out this form again! (?)

Open: Online privacy controls are fine, but allow me to hand the keys over to the Digital Advertising Alliance or FTC. Innocent until proven guilty. I have little to hide.
Closed: I demand online privacy controls, um I have no idea how to use them exactly, what does this lever do? (?)

My point is, smart people are making legislation in 2012 to give you closed people options, for your protection. But, you are wearing swimming earplugs to the fire hydrant party, it’s underkill.

You know how when a police car rides up behind you arbitrarily, though you are doing nothing wrong, he’s like a yellow jacket flying around your picnic sandwich, your heart rate increases, and you wish he’d leave? On the other hand, when the neighbors are fighting in the middle of the night and it sounds like are going to kill each other, when you see those red and blue flashing lights you feel safe and happy they are there?

That’s my policy. The government has every right (and responsibility) to protect you. You, as well, should have every right to opt out of that. Me? My policy is be careful with my money, and separate my spam from my important email, but other than that, I fall hard into the ‘open’ category. Here is a Klout.com list you can follow of others I find ‘open’ on Twitter:

My “open” list on Klout.

(…and by the way, I’m open to suggestions to that list. Because I’m open. You get it.)

Either way, as usual, expect growth in online ad spending in the upcoming years:

Online Ad Spending Forecast

Because as web sites, blogs, magazines, promotions and more expand online, so does the advertising landscape:

Online Ad Channels

The biggest activity (behavior) we take part in online (beside perhaps the one-handed 30-second rewind ~ meow!) is search. Here is where you’ll see most of the digital advertising:

Market Share by Search Engine

I Hate Shopping

An estimated that 30% of online digital ads ($28.5 billion) in the U.S. use behavioral tracking, says AdAge. I want my advertisers to know me, what I like, and how I act. Maybe I’m lacking the old-fashioned gene that makes people drive to a store and walk around looking on the racks and shelves for supplies. It just feels a bit Little House on the Prairie to me.

Online recommendations (live or culled), stylists and catalogs with fun interactivity and social sharing sounds better. Webvan is gone but did you notice Safeway has taken it back up?

Save Face, careful what you fan

This afternoon I received a message from a Facebook friend (not a ‘real’ friend, I’ve never met this person.) It was an invite to become a fan of a Facebook page for Target (or a Target affiliate.) I’m not against fanning, but some fan pages on Facebook are misleading and in fact, can quickly and easily damage your reputation with the social network you’ve built up.

Here is the invite, it sounds pretty good, right?

This is the invte I received from a friend on Facebook

The invite generated by Facebook.

Of course it does. I can’t leave Target without spending over $80.00, so this would come in handy for me. I am the target demographic. Mother, with little time need an all-in-one stop, bargain shopping consumer. So far, so good. Clicking through, with faith, I see deeper.

Most fan pages are a simple click, but this has a "Step 1"

Step 1 is shown...

I am trusting. Too trusting. I click the button that says “Become a Fan”, thinking already about how I will be spending the $500.00. Then, ….the gotcha!

I am now a fan, without $500

They made me a fan, and gave me nothing in return

Now the stipulation is revealed. “IMPORTANT: If you do not invite all of your friends you may not be eligible.”  With several hundred friends (I respect) on Facebook, I would be weary of sending them this invite. How horrible to have them feel the same feeling I just did, and associate that feeling with my name, my company, my brand, my product and so on. Clicking Step 1 made me a fan, so I will have to go unfan the page now.

Careful what you click. As far as I’m concerned, whoever started that Fan page owes me $80.00 for my help in pointing out poor business practices surrounding them.

Careful what you click.